Be kind to everyone – this is a hard one.

Blog Category: Compassion,Wisdom
Blogged by: Jobst Schmalenbach
Created on: October 15, 2016 at 3:32 pm
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Be kind to everyone – these days this is a real hard one especially when you surrounded by real pricks.

How can you be kind to Donald Trump?

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle you know nothing about.

This quote has been accredited to Plato many times, but it is thought to come from Ian Maclaren[1].

Look, I know how bloody hard this is – while I do not succeed everytime I am having a real crack at it! My patience and kindness is tested every day as I am a system administrator. I love my job, I can help people and write stuff that helps making life easy for other people.

But yes, when it comes to politicians, child abusers, molestors and other idiots it becomes real hard.
I leave it up to the reader to judge their own participation.

 

[1] See this one for an investigation.

Compassion Quotes

Blog Category: Compassion,Teachings,Thoughts,Wisdom
Blogged by: Jobst Schmalenbach
Created on: October 13, 2016 at 3:50 pm
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Albert Einstein was ahead of his time in many ways, not only physics.
He recognized very early on that we are all connected.

“A human being is a part of the whole called by us universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feeling as something separated from the rest, a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.”

― Albert Einstein

 

Live here and now, not in the past and not in the future

Blog Category: Happiness,Teachings,Thoughts,Wisdom
Blogged by: Jobst Schmalenbach
Created on: August 27, 2016 at 1:47 pm
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I am not a wordsmith, I have been given another quality that I adore to be a geek, However I happily learn from other wordsmiths and include those lessons learned into my life.

On of those lessons is “Live here and now, not in the past and not in the future”. Why?

Let the Daila Lama explain:

“Man surprised me most about humanity. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money.
Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.”

It just could be you

Blog Category: Wisdom
Blogged by: Jobst Schmalenbach
Created on: September 3, 2014 at 12:22 pm
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wise_buddha

Equanimity

Blog Category: Wisdom
Blogged by: Sue Barrett
Created on: January 7, 2011 at 1:58 pm
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What would the world be like if we all were able to function from a constant state of equanimity?  Here are the definitions of Equanimity as found on Wikipedia:

Equanimity is a state of mental or emotional stability or composure arising from a deep awareness and acceptance of the present moment Equanimity is promoted by several major religious groups.

Hinduism

In Hinduism, equanimity is the concept of balance and centeredness which endures through all possible changes in circumstances. According to the Bhagavad Gītā, one may achieve equanimity through meditation.

Equanimity does not mean sitting around inactive while things are happening, or escaping from the world, or suppressing one’s feelings. Equanimity is operating from the state of supreme watchfulness without an iota of attachment or aversion. ….. A mind of equanimity is an original pure mind free from all suppression, fear, dullness and ignorance.

Buddhism

In Buddhism, equanimity (upekkhā, upekṣhā) is one of the four immeasurables and is considered:

Neither a thought nor an emotion, it is rather the steady conscious realization of reality’s transience. It is the ground for wisdom and freedom and the protector of compassion and love. While some may think of equanimity as dry neutrality or cool aloofness, mature equanimity produces a radiance and warmth of being. The Buddha described a mind filled with equanimity as “abundant, exalted, immeasurable, without hostility and without ill-will.”

Yoga

Equanimity (upeká¹£hā) is also mentioned in Patañjali’s Yoga Sutras (1.33), as one of the four sublime attitudes, along with loving-kindness (maitri), compassion (karuṇā), and joy (mudita). This list is identical to the four immeasurables in Buddhist literature. The Upeksha Yoga school foregrounds equanimity as the most important tenet of a yoga practice.

Judaism

Many Jewish thinkers highlight the importance of equanimity (menuhat ha-nefesh or yishuv ha-da’at) as a necessary foundation for moral and spiritual development. The virtue of equanimity receives particular attention in the writings of rabbis such as Menachem Mendel Lefin and Simcha Zissel Ziv.
Christianity

Samuel Johnson defined equanimity as “evenness of mind, neither elated nor depressed.” In Christian philosophy, equanimity is considered essential for carrying out the theological virtues of gentleness, contentment, temperance, and charity.
Islam

The word “Islam” is derived from the Arabic word Aslama, which denotes the peace that comes from total surrender and acceptance. Being a Muslim can therefore be understood to mean that one is in a state of equanimity.

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